How to Become a Landscape Designer in 5 Steps

Landscape designers are trained in horticulture and are responsible for consulting, planning and designing the arrangement of exterior landscapes. Some states do not require a degree or certification to work as a landscape designer. However, without proper schooling, along with field experience, most landscape designers are limited in their design work. Schools offering Landscape Design degrees can also be found in these popular choices.

What Is a Landscape Designer?

Landscape designers are professionals who focus on garden design and maintenance. They are highly creative and knowledgeable about ecology. They use tools such as computer-aided design and geographic information systems technology to plan designs for outdoor spaces. Some of the places they might design outdoor spaces for include school campuses, private homes, businesses and parks. Landscape designers generate plans that address the needs and budget of the clients, and they must incorporate any landscape variables or drainage issues in those plans. In the table below, you can learn some important details about a career as a landscape designer.

Degree RequiredBachelor's
Education Field of StudyLandscape design, plant and soil science or horticulture
Key ResponsibilitiesDesign garden and landscape layouts; suggest maintenance plans
Licensure RequirementsNot typically required
Median Salary (2017)*$44,847 (for landscape designers)

Source: *PayScale.com

Step 1: Research Landscape Designer Career Duties and Education

In this profession, you may design backyards for private residences, city walkways, highways and parks. You collaborate with your clients to choose the plants that will grow together over the years in a balanced and aesthetically pleasing manner, typically incorporating principles of sustainability. Landscape designers usually need to earn a bachelor's degree and gain years of work experience to qualify for regular positions. Keep in mind that landscape designers are not landscape architects, who require professional education and licensing.

Step 2: Earn a Bachelor's Degree

Find and apply to colleges that have an accredited landscape design program. You might also find a plant and soil science or a horticulture degree program that includes a concentration in landscape design. Most programs last four years and allow for hands-on learning. In landscape design courses, students build their plant vocabulary, learn the history of landscape design and explore topics related to soil, site planning and design.

Courses you may take in this type of program include:

  • Plant biology
  • Plant propagation
  • Turfgrass culture
  • Horticultural pest management
  • Landscape maintenance
  • Landscape contracting business

Step 3: Complete an Internship

While earning an undergraduate degree in landscape design, it is highly recommended that you complete an internship. Prospective landscape designers can work during the summers to gain experience in the field and attract future employers. Check with your school's career services office to find information on internships, or call local landscape firms to see if they accept interns. Some internships are paid, and most provide credit toward your degree.

Step 4: Obtain Employment

As graduation approaches, seek assistance from your college job placement program, or maintain contact with employers with whom you held an internship. Depending upon the amount of experience gained through internships, some recent graduates of landscape design programs may secure jobs at large landscaping companies or start as private consultants. Employers look for candidates who have strong computer skills, knowledge of plants and construction, excellent communication skills and project management ability. Some landscape design positions may require at least three years of experience, and others may require even more.

Step 5: Get Certified

Becoming certified as a landscape designer is beneficial for those seeking self-employment or a job with a respectable company. The Association of Professional Landscape Designers offers certification, requiring membership in good standing, a minimum of four years of experience, an application, a portfolio of three installed projects (including photos, drawings and a plant list), a business statement and a fee. Once certification is obtained, designers may submit their information to professional organizations like the Landscape Design Association to generate business.

What Are Some Related Alternative Careers?

Landscape architects perform similar duties as landscape designers, however landscape architects need at least a bachelor's degree and are required to be licensed. They often work on large-scale or commercial landscape projects and are responsible for preparing site plans and designing both landscapes and hardscapes.

Architects and civil engineers perform many tasks that are similar to the work that landscape designers do. They must meet with clients, determine the client needs, use CAD software to develop proposals, address any landscape features that may affect the project and consider issues such as drainage. They also need to have a bachelor's degree in their field. Hydrologists need a bachelor's degree and specialize in water movement. They focus on issues such as poor water quality or availability, and could also be involved in addressing drainage issues.

To continue researching, browse degree options below for course curriculum, prerequisites and financial aid information. Or, learn more about the subject by reading the related articles below:

  • 1. Degree Options:
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