What Jobs Can You Get with an Associate Degree in General Studies?

Majoring in general studies may allow you to explore your interests while preparing you for entry-level work in office or business settings. Read about some job options for those with a 2-year degree in this field. Schools offering General Studies degrees can also be found in these popular choices.

Associate's Degree in General Studies Defined

An Associate of Arts (AA) or Associate of Science (AS) degree in general studies may prepare you for employment, as described above, or for continued study at the bachelor's degree level. General studies is a broad-based, flexible degree field that introduces you to a variety of different topics, such as business, social sciences, humanities, math, natural sciences, communication, English, computers and foreign languages.

Important Facts About This Occupation

Administrative Assistant Customer Service Representative Bank Teller
Median Salary (2014) $34,500 $33,890 $26,650
Entry-Level Education High school diploma or equivalent High school diploma or equivalent High school diploma or equivalent
Job Outlook (2012-2022) 12% 13% Little to no change projected
Work Environment Office setting, typically full time Office setting, typically full time Bank branches, typically part time

Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics

Administrative Assistant

An administrative assistant performs routine clerical tasks for a business or nonprofit organization. Duties may include greeting visitors, answering phone calls and contributing to the efficient operation of the office. In fulfilling this position, you may also prepare or circulate memos or reports, arrange conference calls and committee meetings, make travel arrangements for company executives or visiting staff and coordinate agendas for your superiors. Tasks may also include receiving and routing incoming mail, maintaining office supplies, establishing and maintaining filing systems and operating office equipment such as computers, fax machines and copiers.

Salary and Career Outlook for Administrative Assistants

The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) lists secondary and elementary schools were the primary employer of these workers as of May 2014, followed by postsecondary schools, but the postal service and central bank monetary authorities offered the highest salaries.

Customer Service Representative

Customer service representatives provide information, assistance or problem resolution services to people who purchase a company's products or services. The nature of your exchanges may vary according to position, but you might work with people by phone, in person or via e-mail, so excellent listening, verbal and written communication skills are vital.

In some positions, you could assist customers with finding the right product in the store. Or you may work with customers by telephone, accepting orders, authorizing returns or exchanges of purchased items, answering product and service questions and canceling accounts. Some customer service representative jobs include preparing and submitting reports, handling billing matters and conferring with supervisors or colleagues to resolve customer service inquiries. You may also handle complaints or service issues, which you are to do your best to resolve while following company protocol and policies.

Salary and Career Outlook for Customer Service Representatives

As of 2014, most customer service representatives earned between $19,860 and $51,630 per year, the BLS states, and those employed in the District of Columbia, Massachusetts and California saw the highest wages.

Bank Teller

Bank tellers are customer service representatives specifically employed by banks. As a bank teller, you would regularly interact with customers in person and by phone and may assist them with routine tasks such as opening or closing accounts, submitting loan payments, withdrawing money, cashing checks and depositing cash. You must be knowledgeable about the financial services offered by the institution that employs you and be prepared to offer these services to customers as appropriate. Additionally, you might help customers with resolving account discrepancies. You may also be responsible for counting cash drawers at the end of a shift and properly receiving armored car deposits according to bank policies and procedures.

Salary and Career Outlook for Bank Tellers

According to BLS data, tellers who worked for state government agencies made the most as of 2014, earning an average wage of $42,470 per year. Alaska and the District of Columbia were the occupation's highest-paying states as of 2014, while Iowa and Arkansas offered higher-than-average numbers of jobs in the field.

To continue researching, browse degree options below for course curriculum, prerequisites and financial aid information. Or, learn more about the subject by reading the related articles below:

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