Marketing Assistants: Career and Salary Facts

Research what it takes to become a marketing assistant. Learn about: the duties of this job, the education requirements and salary to find out if this is the career for you. Schools offering Marketing degrees can also be found in these popular choices.

What Is a Marketing Assistant?

Marketing assistants support the internal and external communication efforts of their employer in a variety of ways. They often arrange staff meetings, prepare memos and reports and maintain databases. Marketing assistants may also answer phone calls, distribute mail and schedule appointments. These professionals also support different staff members of the marketing department, and assist them with various tasks. They may help prepare presentations, research clients and edit documents. Marketing assistants need to have good communication and organization skills as they help the office run more efficiently. The following chart provides an overview of the education, job outlook and average salary in this field.

Degree Required High school diploma or equivalent; postsecondary education preferred
Education Field of Study Marketing, communication, advertising, journalism, public relations
Key Responsibilities Assist in researching, preparing and communicating employer's messages via print, broadcast, video, online, and in person
Job Growth (2014-24) 3% (for secretaries and administrative assistants)*
Median Salary (2017) $36,016**

Sources: *U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics **Payscale.com

What Education Do I Need to Become a Marketing Assistant?

You need at least a high school diploma to become a marketing assistant, but you will probably want to obtain a college education, too. Most marketing assistants have a college degree. Although some have an associate's degree, the vast majority of marketing assistants with a college education possess a bachelor's degree, according to Salary.com.

Most college-educated individuals working in the marketing industry majored in marketing or advertising, according to The Wall Street Journal. However, those two programs are not the only choices if you want to become a marketing assistant. If you plan to seek a bachelor's degree, your options for a major could also include business, public relations, communications, journalism, economics, English, political science or even psychology. A master's degree in business administration is another possibility to consider.

What Job Duties Could I Have?

A marketing assistant helps the marketing department at a company, organization, government agency or educational institution. Your exact duties will be shaped by your employer's requirements and whether your employer is a company, organization, government or school.

Expect to perform daily office duties, such as communicating with visitors, filing, answering phones, setting meetings, opening mail and sending faxes. Computer skills, social media expertise and writing talent could boost your chances for more responsibilities, career advancement and higher pay. You might prepare marketing materials, including press statements and announcements of new merchandise. You might monitor budgets and costs, update websites and enter data. Your responsibilities might include researching prices, gathering information on customer preferences and performing market surveys. You could help plan special events and make travel plans for other marketing department employees.

What Salary Could I Earn?

Most marketing assistants earn a median annual salary of $36,016 as of January 2017, according to PayScale.com. You could receive a higher salary with more experience and postsecondary education.

What Are Some Related Alternative Careers?

General office clerks and receptionists are a couple of similar positions that require a high school diploma. General office clerks perform many of the same clerical tasks as a marketing assistant, but can work in any type of office. Receptionists also perform administrative duties, but they also greet and direct guests that visit an organization. Medical transcriptionists are also related, but require a postsecondary nondegree award. These professionals convert voice recordings from doctors into written documents. They also edit some medical documents.

To continue researching, browse degree options below for course curriculum, prerequisites and financial aid information. Or, learn more about the subject by reading the related articles below:

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