Political Reporter Associate's Degree

Political reporting programs aren't usually offered at the associate's level; however, taking journalism and political science courses could lead to this career. Earning a bachelor's degree or getting an internship or a job at a newspaper or radio station are ways to work towards a career as a reporter. Schools offering Political Science degrees can also be found in these popular choices.

How Can I Study Political Reporting at the Associate's Level?

You can enroll in a journalism degree program in order to gain the necessary skills to become a political reporter. An emphasis in general reporting may be available. Additionally, you can supplement your education with political science electives. This course of study usually takes 2-3 years to complete and can prepare you to seek entry-level careers in journalism or to continue your education at the bachelor's level. You probably won't find this degree program in an online format, but it is widely available at traditional college campuses.

Fields of Study Journalism with an emphasis in general reporting, political science electives
Common CoursesMass media, reporting practices, news writing and editing, magazine editing, feature writing for magazines
Continuing Education Bachelor's in journalism, master's in journalism
Job Outlook 8% decline for all reporters and correspondents projected from 2014-2024*

Source: *U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics'

What Can I Learn?

Associate's degree programs in journalism combine general education classes with classes in writing, editing and reporting. You can expect to take several communication classes, and many programs require students to work for a school-based publication. You might also learn about other aspects of journalism, such as magazine design or photography. Other areas of study could include organizational communication, public speaking or public relations. The following are examples of classes you could enroll in:

  • Composition
  • Mass media
  • Internet media theory
  • Reporting practices
  • Feature writing for magazines
  • News writing and editing
  • Magazine editing
  • Writing for the Internet

How Can I Continue My Education?

If you want to continue your education in journalism, you can pursue a bachelor's degree in the field, which typically takes four years to complete. Some schools may accept transfer credit from your associate's degree program, allowing you to graduate sooner. Additionally, you may be able to double major in journalism and political science, which could better prepare you to work as a political reporter. Journalism programs at the master's level are also available. More advanced programs may include coursework in foreign reporting, military affairs and government issues.

What Is the Job Market Like?

According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), reporters and correspondents earned a median annual salary of $36,000 as of May 2014. The BLS also reported an expected employment declination rate of eight percent for reporters and correspondents between 2014 and 2024, due mainly decreased advertisement revenue for newspapers, radio and television. In a competitive field, applicants with experience working at television or radio stations and those who have completed internships on school newspapers have a better chance of getting jobs.

To continue researching, browse degree options below for course curriculum, prerequisites and financial aid information. Or, learn more about the subject by reading the related articles below:

  • 1. Degree Options:
The schools in the listing below are not free and may include sponsored content but are popular choices among our users. Tuition and costs will vary across programs and locations. Be sure to always request tuition information before starting a program.

Popular Schools