World History Teacher: Career and Salary Facts

Explore a career as a world history teacher. Learn about education and licensing requirements, salaries and potential job growth to see if this is the right career choice for you. Schools offering Teaching - Social Science degrees can also be found in these popular choices.

What Is a World History Teacher?

World history teachers introduce students at different levels to an approach to history that goes beyond borders and nations and focuses on cultural, economic and political interactions and exchanges that have affected the development of mankind. They often use a variety of instructional materials to teach the subject, including in-class lectures, readings from textbooks and primary sources, films, news broadcasts and group discussions. In addition, teachers evaluate student progress through quizzes, regular assignments, exams and essays. Aside from their teaching duties, middle and high school teachers are often required to supervise students both in and outside the classroom, such as in the hallway or lunchroom. College professors are expected to conduct research in a particular subfield of world history and publish their work in books or academic journals; they may also supervise the research of graduate students.

The following chart gives you an overview of a career as a world history teacher.

Middle School World History Teacher High School World History TeacherPostsecondary World History Teacher
Degree required Bachelor's degree Bachelor's degree Doctoral degree for 4-year university positions; master's degree for junior college teachers
Field of Study History,
Elementary education
History with secondary education minor History
Licensure State license or certification for public school teachers State license or certification for public school teachers None
Average Salary (2015) $58,760 for all middle school teachers* $60,440 for all high school teachers*$76,670 for all postsecondary history teachers*
Job Growth (2014-2024) 6% for all middle school teachers* 6% for all high school teachers* 10% for all postsecondary history teachers*

Source: *U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics

What Degree Do I Need to Become a World History Teacher?

If you want to teach history at the middle school or high school levels, you need to earn at least a bachelor's degree in history and complete a teacher education program before seeking licensure. As a history major, you can study ancient world civilizations, African history or Latin American societies. You may also take critical thinking courses and acquire skills in research and statistical analysis. All states require middle and high school teachers to be licensed. Requirements vary by state, but most require you to complete student teaching hours and pass an exam.

Postsecondary instructor or part-time teaching positions may require you to have a master's degree in history. A Ph.D. as well as substantial research experience in the field is generally required for professors and university faculty seeking tenure.

Master's degree programs in history take 2-3 years to complete and often focus on research. You could study subjects like wars, migration, trade, technical revolutions or diplomacy. Other areas of study could include economic trends, disease epidemics and environmental change. Master's degree programs in history typically culminate in either a thesis or a comprehensive exam.

In a Ph.D. program in history, you may need to teach undergraduates as well as take classes, especially in programs that offer funding to doctoral candidates. Courses may cover research methodologies and the role of technology in historical analysis and study. These programs culminate in a dissertation, a book-length work of original research on a specific topic of world history.

What Are the Job Duties?

World history teachers are responsible for teaching students about historical events and testing them on what they learn. Class topics could include world religions, colonization, world wars or imperialism. You may also teach students about different cultures or focus on a specific world region. Teachers are also responsible for keeping track of student records, grades and attendance.

Some teachers may be required to teach a curriculum developed by state education boards. Especially at the postsecondary level, you may develop your own curriculum. Postsecondary history courses may cover American history, modern civilizations or medieval culture. Teaching at the middle school and high school levels, you could also act as an advisor for students or facilitate extracurricular programs, while as a postsecondary teacher, you may have research requirements or obligations to academic and departmental committees.

What Is the Job Market and Salary?

The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reported that employment for middle school teachers was expected to increase 6% between 2014 and 2024, and the employment of high school teachers was also expected to rise 6%. Jobs for postsecondary history teachers are expected to increase by 10%. As of 2015, the median annual salary for middle school teachers was $55,860; the medians were $57,200 for high school teachers and $69,400 for college history professors.

What Are Some Related Alternative Careers?

Another option in the education field is a job as an elementary school teacher. These teachers do not usually specialize in a particular subfield like history; rather, they provide a more general education that helps young students build the foundational knowledge and skills that they will need for success at higher levels in the future. Like middle and high school teachers, they need a bachelor's degree and a teaching license. For history enthusiasts, another possibility is a job as an archivist at a museum. These professionals usually need a master's degree in history or a closely related field. They are responsible for the evaluation, preservation and management of historical documents and artifacts.

To continue researching, browse degree options below for course curriculum, prerequisites and financial aid information. Or, learn more about the subject by reading the related articles below:

  • 1. Degree Options:
The schools in the listing below are not free and may include sponsored content but are popular choices among our users. Tuition and costs will vary across programs and locations. Be sure to always request tuition information before starting a program.

Popular Schools

  • Grand Canyon University

    Grand Canyon University responds quickly to information requests through this website.

    Popular programs at Grand Canyon University:

    • Doctoral
    • Master
    • Bachelor Degrees

    Online Programs Available

  • Saint Leo University

    Saint Leo University responds quickly to information requests through this website.

    Popular programs at Saint Leo University:

    • Master

    Online Programs Available

  • Purdue University Global

    Purdue University Global responds quickly to information requests through this website.

    Popular programs at Purdue University Global:

    • Bachelor Degrees

    Online Programs Available

  • Southern New Hampshire University

    Southern New Hampshire University responds quickly to information requests through this website.

    Popular programs at Southern New Hampshire University:

    • Master

    Online Programs Available

  • Colorado Christian University

    Colorado Christian University responds quickly to information requests through this website.

    Popular programs at Colorado Christian University:

    • Bachelor Degrees

    Online Programs Available

  • Penn Foster High School

    Penn Foster High School responds quickly to information requests through this website.

    Popular programs at Penn Foster High School:

    Online Programs Available

  • Marquette University

    Campus Locations:

    • Wisconsin: Milwaukee
  • Regent University

    Regent University responds quickly to information requests through this website.

    Popular programs at Regent University:

    • Doctoral
    • Master
    • Bachelor Degrees

    Online Programs Available