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Master's Degree Programs in World History

Individuals interested in history can choose to further their education and earn a master's degree in world history. Find out more about programs like this, potential courses, job opportunities, and career statistics.

How to Earn a Master's Degree in World History

Before anyone can enter a master's degree program in world history, they will need to meet admission requirements like a minimum GPA in previous coursework, and they will need to submit items like their GRE test scores, letters of recommendation, and previous college transcripts. These programs require students to complete 30 to 32 credits of coursework; accelerated programs can take as little as one year, and regular programs might take around 2 years. A few of the courses that students may take include theory and methods in history, history and gender, and World War I.

Theory and Methods in History

A course on theory and methods in history will teach students about the art and science of analyzing history. Also covered will be the study of past historians and research techniques that may be beneficial to the students. By the end of the class, those in attendance should be prepared to conduct their own research, analyze their results, and write about them effectively.

Environmental History

Environmental history is a course that will help students to understand the relationships that exist between nature and humans. Students will look at pieces of literature written on environmental history and how the ideas expressed in them affected attitudes and policy. Other topics that may be covered in this class include pollution, changing of landscapes, acquiring natural resources, and changes made around the world that had an impact on history.

Early Modern European History

Courses like these typically cover the history of Europe from the 16th century up through the 18th century. Some of the areas that may be covered are population sizes, literacy, and historically important revolts. Students will be able to understand how society in Europe developed, the culture that emerged from it and how it affects us today. Emphasis may be placed on Western Europe and its developments.

History and Gender

Students in a history and gender class will compare the issues revolving around sexuality and gender identity in different cultures throughout the world. Classes like these cover the history of both genders but most look at women's history, particularly as a marginalized gender. This is often a lecture course that will require students to spend several hours outside of class each week doing their own reproach and preparations.

Soviet History

Soviet history is a class that will cover multiple periods in the history of Russia, including the Soviet Union and Stalin's rule. Students have a chance to touch on both the economic and cultural history of Soviet Russia as well. Additional topics that may be addressed include Imperial Russia, the collapse of the Soviet Union and the Iron Curtain, revolutions in Russia, and the Cold War.

United States Cultural History

Courses like these cover the history of early America up to the late 1800s. A United States cultural history course delves into how culture in the country changed, and what society was like in early America. Other topics covered in this class include gender, colonial times, social classes, race, the Civil War, culture, and the revolution.

Related Careers

Historian

A historian's job is to study and research history, and they typically need a minimum of a master's degree in the field. According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics in 2019, the median salary for these professionals was $63,680. The job growth for this career from 2018 to 2028 is expected to be 6%, which is in line with the average for all occupations.

Archivist, Curator, or Museum Worker

Archivists, curators, and museum workers all need to have a master's degree in history or a related field, and they are responsible for handling, organizing, and possibly restoring historical artifacts. The median salary for this position as of 2019 was $49,850, and the growth rate was faster than the average at 9%.

Postsecondary Teacher

Another position that someone with a master's degree in world history can pursue is a postsecondary teacher. These teachers work at colleges or universities, and they need to have at least a master's degree in the field that they plan to teach. The median salary reported for 2019 was $79,540, and the growth rate was significantly faster than average at 11%.

Job TitleMedian Salary (2019)*Job Outlook (2018-2028)*
Historian$63,6806%
Archivist, Curator, or Museum Worker$49,8509%
Postsecondary Teacher$79,54011%

*Source: National Center for Education Statistics

If applicants meet the set admission requirements, they can enter into a master's degree program in world history and take courses like soviet history, environmental history, and theory and methods in history. Once they complete their degree program, they can enter the workforce with careers as postsecondary teachers, historians, archivists, curators, or museum workers.