Cultural Resource Management and Policy

Cultural resources management is concerned with the preservation, documentation and analysis of cultural resources. Read further for more on career opportunities, required education and training, job prospects and earning potential.

Is Cultural Resources Management and Policy for Me?

Career Overview

With the right graduate degree or certificate, a discerning eye for details and the versatility to handle tasks both indoors and in the field, you could pursue the diverse opportunities in cultural resources management. As an architectural historian or historic preservation consultant, you'd survey buildings or sites to determine their cultural value. As an architectural conservator, you'd also do surveying, but your work would include determining the proper techniques for restoration and repair. You could also become a craftsman and perform the actual restoration.

Additional Job Possibilities

Being a cultural resources lawyer, where you'd work with property owners, government officials and citizens regarding the National Historic Preservation Act, might be a good choice if you're interested in public policy. Other career options are archaeologist, museum conservator, archivist, museum technician and museum curator.

Employment Information

You can expect good job opportunities for most professions in cultural resources management, though competition may be keen. According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), job growth for archaeologists is expected to be 19% during the 2012-2022 decade (www.bls.gov). Museum archivists, curators and conservators could see 11% growth and lawyers 10% growth. The BLS also reports varying wages within these professions. In 2013, museum conservators and technicians earned a median salary of $40,020, archivists made $49,110, archaeologists took home $58,360 and museum curators received $50,550. Lawyers, including cultural resources lawyers, earned median wages of $114,300 during the same year.

How Can I Work in Cultural Resources Management?

Undergraduate Education

Training in cultural resources management is available at both the undergraduate and graduate levels and is usually interdisciplinary. For example, you might study the connections between archaeology, art history, public policy and computer technology. To be a restoration craftsman, you could pursue an associate's or bachelor's degree in building arts.

Graduate Programs

In graduate school, you might focus on a special interest as part of a broader program, such as earning a Master of Arts in Art History with a focus on historic preservation. If you're an aspiring attorney, you'd need to get a bachelor's degree, go to law school and then pass the bar exam.

An archaeology career requires at least a bachelor's degree, but a master's degree in archaeology could improve your job opportunities. Archivists are required to have a master's degree in history, library science or archival studies, with voluntary certification available through the Academy of Certified Archivists. Getting field experience is important whether your goal is archaeology, museum work or preservation.

Related Articles for Cultural Resource Management and Policy

View More Articles

Related Videos

  • Human Resource Management Degree Options - Video

    Many schools offer degree options in Human Resource Management. These degrees range from a Bachelor's of Human Resource Management to an MBA in Human Resources. Entry-level positions are obtainable with a four-year degree in the field, but advanced degrees are required for those wishing to obtain mid- to senior-level positions.
  • Sports Management Degrees - Video

    A Sports Management degree program prepares students to work in the growing and diverse field of sports management. Students who earn this degree can work as sports agents, managers, directors, administrators and coaches.
The schools in the listing below are not free and may include sponsored content but are popular choices among our users. Tuition and costs will vary across programs and locations. Be sure to always request tuition information before starting a program.

Popular Schools

  • Kaplan University

    Kaplan University responds quickly to information requests through this website.

    Popular programs at Kaplan University:

    • Bachelor Degrees

    Online Programs Available

  • Ashford University

    Ashford University responds quickly to information requests through this website.

    Popular programs at Ashford University:

    Online Programs Available

  • Johns Hopkins University

    Johns Hopkins University responds quickly to information requests through this website.

    Popular programs at Johns Hopkins University:

    • Master

    Online Programs Available

  • Regent University

    Regent University responds quickly to information requests through this website.

    Popular programs at Regent University:

    • Master
    • Bachelor Degrees

    Online Programs Available

  • Concordia University Portland

    Concordia University Portland responds quickly to information requests through this website.

    Popular programs at Concordia University Portland:

    • Master

    Online Programs Available

  • Southern New Hampshire University

    Southern New Hampshire University responds quickly to information requests through this website.

    Popular programs at Southern New Hampshire University:

    • Master
    • Bachelor Degrees

    Online Programs Available

  • Penn Foster High School

    Penn Foster High School responds quickly to information requests through this website.

    Popular programs at Penn Foster High School:

    Online Programs Available

  • Southern Oregon University

    Campus Locations:

    • Oregon: Ashland
  • Sonoma State University

    Campus Locations:

    • California: Rohnert Park
  • Carnegie Mellon University

    Campus Locations:

    • Pennsylvania: Pittsburgh