Construction Masonry

Construction masons use their physical and technical skills to set and prepare concrete. If you like working with your hands and seeing the results of your work, then read on for more information about salaries and training options for construction masons.

Is Construction Masonry for Me?

Career Overview

Construction masonry workers prepare and set concrete for the building of structures, roads, bridges and other construction projects. Masons spread and level concrete after it is poured, ensuring it sets to plan specifications. Construction masons monitor weather and temperature to adjust the curing procedures as necessary. Some construction masons may also find work as bricklayers. If you'd like to work as a construction mason, blueprint reading and mathematics skills are necessary. You should be able to work both independently and as part of a team. Physical fitness is also important.

Career and Salary Information

Construction masons earned a median annual wage of $36,130 in May 2013, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS). Nationwide, employment prospects for both cement masons and terrazzo workers were expected to increase by a much-faster-than-average rate of 29% between 2012 and 2022. Construction masons usually work a 40-hour workweek, although weather and coordination with other stages of the construction project can increase or reduce work time. Construction masons may advance to construction manager, site supervisor, building inspector and cost estimator with enough training and experience (www.bls.gov).

How Can I Become a Construction Mason?

Apprenticeships and On-the-Job Training

Many construction masons learn their craft on the job, but you usually need at least a high school education to enter the field. Trainees begin with simple tasks, such as smoothing fresh concrete. Upon completion of a program, you should be able to place concrete, level it and finish it without assistance. Mason apprenticeships can also provide instruction in cost assessment and layout plans, in addition to training in masonry.

Certificate and Degree Programs

You can also enroll in a formal training or certificate program, which can take up to one year to complete. Aspiring masons usually take a variety of general construction courses, such as blueprint reading, construction safety and principles of stonework. You can start preparing for a career in construction masonry through high school courses in geometry and algebra. A degree in construction technology can also be useful if you hope to advance to other construction careers.

Related Articles for Construction Masonry

View More Articles

Related Videos

  • How Do I Become a Certified Safety Professional? - Video

    Certified Safety Professionals (CSPs) can work in many different industries, including insurance, manufacturing, engineering, construction and transportation. To be Certified as a Safety Professional, you need to meet specific academic and experience requirements.
  • How Do I Enter a Career in Carpentry? - Video

    Why become a carpenter? Construction is among the largest industries in the nation. Even in times of economic distress, skilled carpentry professionals care still needed to build and make repairs to residential, commercial and industrial sites around the country. Learn more about the training options you can pursue to join the ranks of carpenters in your area.
The schools in the listing below are not free and may include sponsored content but are popular choices among our users. Tuition and costs will vary across programs and locations. Be sure to always request tuition information before starting a program.

Popular Schools