Colleges with an Actuarial Science Degree

Find out about the subjects you'll study in an undergraduate or graduate actuarial science degree program. Learn about professional certification and licensure requirements for actuaries. Schools offering Risk Management degrees can also be found in these popular choices.

To enter the field of actuarial science, completion of an educational program is a must. Find out what types of degree programs are available in actuarial science, where they can be found, and more in this informational article.

What Are Actuarial Degree Programs Like?

According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), more than 100 colleges and universities offer degree programs in actuarial science, including programs leading to a Bachelor of Science in Actuarial Science or a Bachelor of Business Administration in Actuarial Science (www.bls.gov). Through a mix of mathematics, statistics and economics classes, you'll learn how to combine your quantitative skills with business management skills. The program can prepare you for an entry-level position at health and life insurance companies or a consulting position in business and government.

At the graduate level, you could earn an M.S. in Actuarial Science or an M.S. in Statistics with a concentration in actuarial science. Graduate programs typically build on your undergraduate studies by focusing on the theories and concepts associated with actuarial science. Many programs also offer internships that allow you to work alongside professional actuaries.

Which Schools Offer Bachelor Degree Programs in Actuarial Science?

There are a slew of colleges and universities which have bachelor degree programs in actuarial science, including those listed below:

  • Temple University provides a Bachelor of Business Administration in Actuarial Science degree program
  • St. John's University has a Bachelor of Science in Actuarial Science degree program
  • University of Texas Dallas hosts a Bachelor of Science in Actuarial Science degree program

Which Schools Offer Master Degree Programs in Actuarial Science?

A master degree program in actuarial science is offered by various institutions. A handful of these programs include:

  • Boston University delivers a a Master of Science in Actuarial Science degree program
  • University of Iowa houses a Master of Science in Actuarial Science degree program
  • Columbia University has a Master of Science in Actuarial Science degree program

What Will I Learn?

Actuarial science programs are interdisciplinary and will require you to take a broad section of courses that explore the connection between mathematics and business. Some of the subjects you may study include:

  • Accounting
  • Statistics
  • Calculus
  • Finance
  • Microeconomics
  • Loss distributions
  • Risk management
  • Forecasting

Do I Need a License?

While there are no standard licensing requirements, most actuaries pursue professional status through the Casualty Actuarial Society (CAS) and the Society of Actuaries (SOA). According to the BLS, you could work toward certification while still in college, and some employers might even pay your certification fees during the process. Many colleges provide test preparation, so check with your institution to learn more.

The SOA and CAS offer similar exams, and some exams are sponsored by both organizations. Additionally, both organizations offer extensive study materials and continuing education courses that can help you prepare for exams and maintain professional status. The BLS reports that the process of achieving professional status can take 4-8 years.

Actuarial science degree programs are most commonly available at the bachelor or master degree level, and both offer slightly different experiences. Bachelor degree programs in actuarial science are designed to prepare students for an entry-level career in the field, while master degree programs will expand on that knowledge and prepare a student for higher level career positions.

To continue researching, browse degree options below for course curriculum, prerequisites and financial aid information. Or, learn more about the subject by reading the related articles below:

  • 1. Degree Options:
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