Landscaping Art Degree and Training Programs

Landscaping art degrees are offered as landscape design degree programs at the associate's, bachelor's and master's degree levels. Read on to learn more about what programs are available, including online options, what's taught in these degree programs and how you can make landscape art your profession. Schools offering Landscape Design degrees can also be found in these popular choices.

What Landscape Art Degree and Training Programs Are Available?

More commonly called landscape design, you can find associate's, bachelor's and master's degree programs in the landscaping arts. Landscape design is also often offered as a concentration in horticulture degree programs. You can earn degrees through community and technical colleges, vocational schools and universities. If you're looking for non-degree training, you might find stand-alone courses through land-grant university extension offices.

EducationLandscape design degrees available at associate's, bachelor's and master's degree level; stand-alone courses may also be available
Online OptionsNot available online due to hands on nature of study
Common TopicsPlant structure and basic horticulture in undergraduate programs; landscape design theory and construction methods in master's programs
Typical EmployersLandscaping firms, botanical gardens, parks, residential gardens

Are There Online Options?

Because of the hands-on nature of this field of study, you probably won't be able to find any landscape design program conducted over the Internet. Much of the learning takes place in real-world and laboratory settings, making it a difficult program to adapt to distance learning.

What Will I Learn?

In a landscape design degree or training program, you'll learn how artistic concepts are used in creating functional and beautiful outdoor spaces. Introductory courses usually cover basic horticultural topics, like terminology, plant structure and landscape maintenance. Other common courses include soil science, sustainable practices, ecosystems and plant identification. You'll learn different design techniques and software used in the industry to aid in landscape design. Studios, internships, field trips and other hands-on experiences are often a major part of the curriculum.

Master's degree programs often include courses in landscape design theory and history. You'll learn about best practices for industry professionals, construction methods and technical solutions. Graduate programs might offer a focus on research or specialized practices, such as natural landscaping or sustainability. You might also be able to participate in an internship opportunity through the school.

What Kind of Career Could I Have?

If you earn a degree in landscape design, you'll be qualified to work for landscaping firms, garden centers, botanical gardens, public parks and nurseries. Some graduates choose to work for themselves. Landscape designers typically service smaller spaces and residential gardens. Some master's degree-holders might be eligible to oversee city parks, public gardens and large-scale projects.

To continue researching, browse degree options below for course curriculum, prerequisites and financial aid information. Or, learn more about the subject by reading the related articles below:

  • 1. Degree Options:
The schools in the listing below are not free and may include sponsored content but are popular choices among our users. Tuition and costs will vary across programs and locations. Be sure to always request tuition information before starting a program.

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