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Southern New Hampshire University responds quickly to information requests through this website.

Southern New Hampshire University

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Purdue University Global

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Strayer University

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Capella University responds quickly to information requests through this website.

Capella University

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Columbia Southern University

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Full Sail University responds quickly to information requests through this website.

Full Sail University

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Walden University

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Liberty University responds quickly to information requests through this website.

Liberty University

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Grand Canyon University

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Which College Courses Prepare Students to Become a Stock Broker?

Becoming a stock broker requires extensive knowledge of financial markets, regulations, corporate decision-making, and investor behavior. Stock market classes can provide theoretical and technical grounding in these concepts and often take the form of college courses on finance, investment, and economics.

Stock Broker Schools and Courses

A bachelor's degree, preferably in accounting, business, finance, or economics, is usually the minimum requirement to work as a stock broker. Undergraduate courses such as corporate finance, investment management and analysis, financial management, behavioral finance, and financial market regulation can equip students with technical knowledge and skills for a career in stock trading. When choosing a stock broker school, students can consider which ones offer coursework that is relevant to equity trading.

Personal Finance

Personal finance is one of the basic courses that students can take before moving on to more advanced stock market classes. The course typically covers fundamental principles in investing in stocks and bonds, as well as other relevant topics like budgeting, debt management, tax planning, insurance, and building a credit score.

Financial Management

A course on financial management tackles topics like stock and bond valuation, acquisition and cost of capital, financial statement analysis, capital budgeting and management, and financial leverage. Students are expected to learn about the functions and operations of financial markets and institutions as well as ethical issues in financial management.

Corporate Finance

A crucial element in becoming a stock broker is to understand the financial decisions and investment strategies of a company. A corporate finance course focuses on investment and financing policies in corporate settings and covers topics like working capital management, risk and valuation, financial analysis, and dividend policy decisions.

Investment Management

Stock broker schools typically offer a course on investment management, which covers the basic techniques of investment in stocks and stock-linked securities as well as portfolio management. Topics for discussion may include valuation techniques, pricing models of stock, equity derivatives, investment policy statements, and macroeconomic analysis. Investment classes like this teach students how to develop investment objectives and strategies, assess investment performance, and calculate risk-return trade-offs.

Investment Analysis

A course on investment analysis provides more in-depth training on valuation of stocks and derivative securities. Students learn about establishing performance benchmarks, crafting investment policy statements, utilizing financial modeling software, hedging and speculation, and option pricing.

Derivatives

A derivatives course focuses on derivative contracts, including futures, options, and swap contracts, as well as topics like arbitrage pricing, valuation, and trading and hedging strategies. It also covers mathematical techniques employed in derivative pricing and risk management in portfolios and firms.

Macroeconomics

A career in stock trading requires working knowledge of economic systems and policies. A macroeconomics course includes discussions on monetary and fiscal policy, national income, international trade, and capital formation. It may also look into issues that affect economic productivity, such as inflation and unemployment.

Behavioral Finance

Aspiring stock brokers can also benefit from a course on behavioral finance. The course makes use of psychological concepts to assess individual and corporate decision-making in financial markets. It looks into how the biases of individual investors and finance managers can result in market inefficiencies.

Financial Market Regulation

A financial market regulation course focuses on regulatory laws that govern financial markets, including securities, options, futures, and banking. It examines strategies to regulate and protect customers and investors as well as financial institutions and market operations. It also looks into the functions of self-regulatory groups and private firms.